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Golf FAQ

Scoring System

The goal is to play as few strokes per round as possible. A golfer's score is usually expressed as the difference between the player's number of strokes and the par score. A "hole in one" (or an "ace") occurs when a golfer sinks his ball into the cup with his first stroke from the tee. Common scores for a hole also have specific terms as you shall see below.
 Condor means scoring four under par (−4). This is the lowest individual hole score ever made. A condor would be a hole-in-one on a par-five (typically by cutting over a dogleg corner), or a two on a par-six. Par-sixes are exceptionally rare, as are par-sevens.
 Albatross means three shots under par (−3) (the albatross being one of the largest birds); also called a double eagle in the U.S. This is an extremely rare score, and occurs most commonly on par-fives with a strong drive and a holed approach shot. Holes-in-one on par-four holes (generally short ones) are also albatrosses. Albatrosses are much rarer than par-3 holes-in-one; the odds are estimated at one in 1,000,000: the odds of a hole-in-one is around one in 3,700 to one in 12,500, depending on the hole and on skill.
 Eagle means scoring two under par (−2). Eagles usually occur when golfers hit the ball far enough to reach the green with fewer strokes than expected. This most commonly happens on par-fives, though it occasionally occurs on short par-fours. A "hole in one" on a par-three hole also results in an eagle. The name "eagle" was used as a large bird representing a better score than a birdie.
 Birdie means scoring one under par (−1). This expression was coined in 1899, at the Atlantic City Country Club in Northfield, New Jersey. It seems that one day in 1899, three golfers – George Crump (who later built Pine Valley, about 45 miles away), William Poultney Smith (founding member of Pine Valley), and his brother Ab Smith – were playing together when Crump hit his second shot only inches from the cup on a par-four hole after his first shot had struck a bird in flight. Simultaneously, the Smith brothers exclaimed that Crump's shot was "a bird." Crump's short putt left him one-under-par for the hole, and from that day the three of them referred to such a score as a "birdie." In short order, the entire membership of the club began using the term. As the Atlantic City Country Club, being a resort, had many out-of-town visitors, the expression spread and caught the fancy of all American golfers.

Par

 In golf, par is the pre-determined number of strokes that a scratch (or 0 handicap)[1] golfer should require to complete a hole, a round (the sum of the pars of the played holes), or a tournament (the sum of the pars of each round). Pars are the central component of stroke play, the most common kind of play in professional golf tournaments. In theory, pars are achieved by two putts, with the remaining shots being used to reach the green. Reaching the green in two strokes fewer than the hole's par is called achieving a "green in regulation." For example, to reach the green of a par-five hole in regulation, the player would take three (or fewer) strokes, with the other two strokes allocated for putting the ball into the hole. Par derives its name from the Latin for equal.
 Bogey means one shot more than par (+1). "Going round in bogey" originally meant an overall par score, starting at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in 1890, and based on the phrase "bogey man" and a popular music hall song Here Comes the Bogey Man. Nationally, players competed against Colonel Bogey, and this gave the title to a 1914 marching tune, Colonel Bogey March.
 More than one shot over par is known as a double-bogey (+2), triple-bogey (+3), and so on. However, it is more common to hear higher scores referred to simply by the number of strokes rather than by name. For example, a player having taken eight shots to negotiate a par-three, would be far more likely to refer to it as an "eight" or being "five-over-par", rather than a "quintuple-bogey". Double-bogeys and worse scores are uncommon for top performers in professional play.

 

Equipment

 Golf balls are spherical, usually white (although other colours are allowed), and minutely pock-marked by dimples that decrease aerodynamic drag by increasing air turbulence around the ball in motion, which delays "boundary layer" separation and reduces the drag-inducing "wake" behind the ball, thereby allowing the ball to fly farther.
Golf clubs are used to hit the golf ball. Each club is composed of a shaft with a lance (or "grip") on the top end and a club head on the bottom. Long clubs, which have a lower amount of degreed loft, are those meant to propel the ball a comparatively longer distance, and short clubs a higher degree of loft and a comparatively shorter distance. The actual physical length of each club is longer or shorter, depending on the distance the club is intended to propel the ball.

Golf clubs have traditionally been arranged into three basic types. Woods are large-headed, long-shafted clubs meant to propel the ball a long distance from relatively "open" lies, such as the tee box and fairway. Of particular importance is the driver or "1-wood", which is the lowest lofted wood club, and in modern times has become highly specialized for making extremely long-distance tee shots, up to 300 yards (270 m) or more in the hands of a professional golfer. Traditionally these clubs had heads made of a hardwood, hence the name, but virtually all modern woods are now made of metal such as titanium, or of composite materials. Irons are shorter-shafted clubs with a metal head primarily consisting of a flat, angled striking face. Traditionally the clubhead was forged from iron; modern iron clubheads are investment-cast from a steel alloy. Irons of varying loft are used for a variety of shots from virtually anywhere on the course, but most often for shorter-distance shots approaching the green, or to get the ball out of tricky lies such as sand traps. The third class is the putter, which evolved from the irons to create a low-lofted, balanced club designed to roll the ball along the green and into the hole. Putters are virtually always used on the green or in the surrounding rough/fringe. A fourth class, called hybrids, evolved as a cross between woods and irons, and are typically seen replacing the low-lofted irons with a club that provides similar distance, but a higher launch angle and a more forgiving nature.

A maximum of 14 clubs is allowed in a player's bag at one time during a stipulated round. The choice of clubs is at the golfer's discretion, although every club must be constructed in accordance with parameters outlined in the rules. (Clubs that meet these parameters are usually called "conforming".) Violation of these rules can result in disqualification.

The exact shot hit at any given time on a golf course, and which club is used to accomplish the shot, are always completely at the discretion of the golfer; in other words, there is no restriction whatsoever on which club a golfer may or may not use at any time for any shot.

 A tee is allowed only for the first stroke on each hole, unless the player must hit a provisional tee shot or replay his or her first shot from the tee.
 Many golfers wear golf shoes with metal or plastic spikes designed to increase traction, thus allowing for longer and more accurate shots.
 A golf bag is used to transport golf clubs and the player's other or personal equipment. Golf bags have several pockets designed for carrying equipment and supplies such as tees, balls, and gloves. Golf bags can be carried, pulled on a trolley or harnessed to a motorized golf cart during play. Golf bags have both a hand strap and shoulder strap for carrying, and sometimes have retractable legs that allow the bag to stand upright when at rest.

 

Teeing Ground Colors at PMCC

Blue tee markers denote the teeing ground used for championship play in tournaments, and is the tee used by skilled male players who have a low handicap. This tee is almost always the longest yardage for each hole, unless the course has black or gold tees. Championship tees are often called "the tips".
 White tee markers denote the teeing ground used most often by men, typically those who have a middle or high handicaps. This tee is almost always the middle tee between the championship and ladies tee and is often called the "men's tee".
 The gold tees are located in front of the white tee markers and are called the "women's tees." The forward tees usually offer the shortest yardage on the course.
 Red tee markers have shorter yardage than even the red tee markers, and usually indicate where juniors and beginners hit from. Sometimes they are  used as the "senior" tees.
A USGA handicap is calculated with a specific arithmetic formula that approximates how many strokes above or below par a player might be able to play, based on the ten best scores of their last twenty rounds. A handicap is a numerical measure of a golfer's potential playing ability based on the tees played for a given course.

In stroke play, it is used to calculate a net score from the number of strokes actually played during a competition, thus allowing players of different proficiency to play against each other on somewhat equal terms. In match play, the handicap difference between players is used to determine the number of strokes the high handicap player should receive from the low handicapper during the playing of their round. The higher the handicap of a player, the poorer the player is relative to those with lower handicaps.

About PMCC

Paris Mountain Country Club was established in 1938 by J.P. Traynham, a well known golf leader in the Upstate of South Carolina. He took an old A-model type truck to cut the fairways with. Traynham and his children built and ran the course until the 1960s, a family whose name has remained synonymous with golf.

In 2015 the club was once again back under the control of the Traynham family. With the club's long rich history and the touch of the family it has once again brought a boon to the business.

 

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  •   301 Old Rock House Rd.
  •   Greenville, SC 29609
  •   ProShop: (864) 834-4781
  •   The Grill: (864) 834-7573
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  •   Hours: 7 a.m - 7 p.m.

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